science and philosophy of how the mind and body serve each other

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Call for editors for EmbodiedMind.org

Have a hand in guiding the field of embodied cognition! Editors choose what content (articles, books, videos, events, labs, etc.) are shared on the site, and can thus help shape this rapidly emerging interdisciplinary area of interest. Each editor is an ambassador from her or his discipline, sharing with the larger embodied mind community what research is...

Cowie et al. (2013)- Children’s Responses to the Rubber-Hand Illusion Reveal Dissociable Pathways in Body Representation

Cowie, D., Makin, T. R., & Bremner, A. J. (2013). Children’s Responses to the Rubber-Hand Illusion Reveal Dissociable Pathways in Body Representation. [Epub ahead of print].

Bruggeman et al. (2013)- Dynamic Manipulation Generates Touch Information That Can Modify Vision

Bruggeman, H., Silver, C., Domini, F., & Song, J. (2013). Dynamic Manipulation Generates Touch Information That Can Modify Vision. [Epub ahead of print].

Dolscheid et al. (2013)- The Thickness of Musical Pitch: Psychophysical Evidence for Linguistic Relativity

Dolscheid, S., Shayan, S., Majid, A., & Casasanto, D. (2013). The Thickness of Musical Pitch: Psychophysical Evidence for Linguistic Relativity. Psychological Science. [Epub ahead of print].

Fessler & Holbrook (2013)- Friends Shrink Foes: The Presence of Comrades Decreases the Envisioned Physical Formidability of an Opponent

D. M. T. Fessler, & Holbrook, C. (2013). Friends Shrink Foes: The Presence of Comrades Decreases the Envisioned Physical Formidability of an Opponent. Psychological Science. [Epub ahead of print].

Graham et al. (2013)- What Sleeping Babies Hear: A Functional MRI Study of Interparental Conflict and Infants’ Emotion Processing

Graham, A. M., Fisher, P. A., & Pfeifer, J. H. (2013). What Sleeping Babies Hear: A Functional MRI Study of Interparental Conflict and Infants’ Emotion Processing. Psychological Science. [Epub ahead of print].

Schneider et al. (2013)- One way and the other: The bidirectional relationship between ambivalence and body movement

As the authors note, our experiences of ambivalence are often described in physical terms, as when we say we are "torn" or "moving" between two options, for example. In order to investigate the relationship between ambivalence and side-to-side movement, two studies were conducted. The first involved the use of a Wii Balance Board to quantify movement; it was found that those experiencing ambivalence exhibit more side-to-side movement than those who are not. During the second study, the reverse relationship was explored; it was found that when body movement is induced, experiences of ambivalence are heightened.

Brockmole et al. (2013)- The world within reach: Effects of hand posture and tool use on visual cognition

Brockmole, J. R., Davoli1, C. C., Abrams, R. A., & Witt, J. K. (2013). The world within reach: Effects of hand posture and tool use on visual cognition. Current Directions in Psychological Science. 22(1): 38-44.

Dunning & Balcetis (2013)- Wishful seeing: How preferences shape visual perception

Dunning, D., & Balcetis, E. (2013). Wishful seeing: How preferences shape visual perception. Current Directions in Psychological Science. 22(1): 33-37.

Briñol et al. (2012)- Treating thoughts as material objects can increase or decrease their impact on evaluation

In the present research, the authors investigated whether the objectification of thoughts can affect the use of thoughts in following evaluations. In the first experiment, participants wrote about the likes and dislikes about their body. Afterward, the paper they wrote their thoughts on was either ripped up and thrown away or kept. It was found that the discarded thoughts were less employed in judgment formation than for participants who kept their thought representation. That is, physically throwing away the thoughts led them to be mentally thrown away as well. In the second experiment, this finding was replicated, demonstrating that participants relied on their thoughts more when the thought representations were physically held in their pockets versus when the thought representations were discarded. The third study showed that these effects were enhanced when the action was physically performed and not just simply imagined.